BAGHDAD—As soon as the most recent round of U.S. sanctions, announced by the Trump administration on Aug. 7, hit Iran, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al Abadi said his country would reluctantly comply.
Last week, the Saudi government expelled the Canadian ambassador from Riyadh, and canceled flights, educational exchanges, and trade and investment activities between the two countries.
It was the sort of scene that has become ubiquitous across the Middle East. A small convoy of vehicles, packed with armed men, approach a rickety checkpoint manned by another group of armed men.
Although it got little attention at the time, the war in Yemen began more than four years ago in July 2014.
Don’t look for any improvement in U.S.-Iranian relations anytime soon, or for a summit between President Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.
Last week, under the darkness of night in the far-flung villages of southwest Syria, death came knocking at the doors of their slumbering Druze community.
During this week’s visit to the United Arab Emirates, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told his hosts than a new nuclear deal with Iran ought to be of “permanent” duration and address the Islamic Republic’s “malign activity” in neighboring states.